Industry Regulations

From SimpleGov

Industry Regulations

Last Updated Projects in Industry Regulations

21
The high cost of (not) stopping people getting high
Prohibition of marijuana, just like prohibition of alcohol before it, has been a costly failure. Treasury’s informal estimate of the cost is over $300 million per year and the benefits to date, in terms of reduction in usage, are modest.
See more
EU’s Disastrous Internet Law: What Happens Next?
In a stunning rejection of the will of five million online petitioners, and over 100,000 protestors this weekend, the European Parliament has abandoned common-sense and the advice of academics, technologists, and UN human rights experts, and approved the Copyright in the Digital Single Market Directive in its entirety. There’s now little that can stop these provisions from becoming the law of the land across Europe.  The results will be drawn-out, and chaotic. Unlike EU Regulations like the GDPR, which become law on passage by the central EU institutions, EU Directives have to be transposed: written into each member country’s national law. Countries have until 2021 to transpose the Copyright Directive, but EU rarely keeps its members to that deadline, so it could take even longer. We can expect media and rightsholders to lobby for the most draconian possible national laws, then promptly march to the courts to extract fines whenever anyone online wanders over its fuzzy lines. The Directive is written so that any owner of copyrighted material can demand satisfaction from an Internet service, and we’ve already seen that the rightsholders are by no means united on what Big Tech should be doing. Whatever Internet companies and organizations do to comply with twenty-seven or more national laws – from dropping links to European news sites entirely, to upping their already over-sensitive filtering systems, or seeking to strike deals with key media conglomerates – will be challenged by one rightsholder faction or another.
See more
San Bernardino's Corrupt and Illegal Cannabis Licensing Program
This project addresses facts that appear to show both intentional City corruption and potential City incompetence. Specifically, the City of San Bernardino issued cannabis licenses to a number of businesses who it is illegal to issue permits to. These businesses were shown to be too close to “sensitive uses” under the Municipal Code and violated the General Plan. Despite the fact that the City Council was advised of this by City staff, the City Attorney, some of the applicants who did not receive licenses, and the general public, the City Council went forward with awarding those permits. This appears to have been done knowingly by at least some within the City. The evidence suggests that there was a “pay for play” scheme involving the marijuana permitees, the City Manager (Defendant Andrea Miller) and the former Mayor (Carey Davis). This is because the City Manager (Defendant Andrea Miller) set up meetings between the former Mayor (Carey Davis)’s campaign funder, Scott Beard, and the marijuana groups that should have been disqualified under the Municipal Code and State Law. The marijuana groups texted to confirm campaign contributions to the former Mayor’s campaign, both on and off the books. These same businesses received marijuana permits from the City Council despite being disqualified. This was accomplished through a combination of intentional acts by some within the City, and incompetence through others at the City directed by those taking intentional acts.
See more