Ban the Box

African Americans make up roughly 13% of the U.S. population, but 40% of its prisoners. More than 600,000 incarcerated individuals leave U.S. prisons each year. Returning citizens who gain employment are more than 1/3 less likely than... Read more
African Americans make up roughly 13% of the U.S. population, but 40% of its prisoners. More than 600,000 incarcerated individuals leave U.S. prisons each year. Returning citizens who gain employment are more than 1/3 less likely than their counterparts to return to crime, and are more capable of turning their lives around permanently. Although they have paid their debt and served their time, individuals with a criminal history are too often denied the opportunity at legitimate employment, which would help engage them in productive activities that improve the quality of life for everyone and enable them to become productive members of society. Read less
Baltimore, MD ( Federal)
July 22, 2018
Submitted by: naacp
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NAACP

July 22, 2018In efforts to eliminate employment barriers for formerly incarcerated people, public entities (local municipalities and state governments), as well as corporations and business, must “ban the box” or remove the question about criminal history from the initial job application forms. This question should be asked during the face to face... Read more
July 22, 2018

In efforts to eliminate employment barriers for formerly incarcerated people, public entities (local municipalities and state governments), as well as corporations and business, must “ban the box” or remove the question about criminal history from the initial job application forms. This question should be asked during the face to face interview and only in instances where criminal history relates to the job in question. In this way, formerly incarcerated people will have the opportunity to meet and interview for jobs, increasing the applicant’s chances for employment.

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NAACP

July 22, 2018

The Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit allows a company to claim a tax credit of up to $2,400 for hiring an employee with a felony conviction within one year of the date of his or her conviction or release form incarceration. The U.S. Department of Labor offers a free bonding program for “at-risk” job applicants, including people... Read more

July 22, 2018

The Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit allows a company to claim a tax credit of up to $2,400 for hiring an employee with a felony conviction within one year of the date of his or her conviction or release form incarceration. The U.S. Department of Labor offers a free bonding program for “at-risk” job applicants, including people with criminal records, indemnifying employees for loss of money or property due to an employee’s dishonesty or theft.

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Ban the Box

- NAACP

Parolees Who Return to Prison

May 17, 2008 - New York Times