International Space Station Privatization Project

NASA is spending too much on keeping the ISS in orbit, and that it dilutes the mission of the space agency in terms of human space exploration. Trump has proposed privatizing ISS, but the issue remains complex.
Washington, DC ( )
April 21, 2018
Submitted by: rocketman822

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Lewis Rodriguez

April 21, 2018

“If they just flip the switch, it won’t work,” says Dylan Taylor, a space investor and founder of Space Angels, a venture capital firm that has invested in 50 space-related firms in the past few years. A five-year transition will help find a company that can keep things running, with the help of experienced NASA managers on call if... Read more

April 21, 2018

“If they just flip the switch, it won’t work,” says Dylan Taylor, a space investor and founder of Space Angels, a venture capital firm that has invested in 50 space-related firms in the past few years. A five-year transition will help find a company that can keep things running, with the help of experienced NASA managers on call if something goes awry. “I would see one master logistics operator for resupply and scheduling,” Taylor says. “Then someone who is actually subdividing the volume of the space station to other operators who would use it for monetary purposes.”

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Lucas Girard

April 21, 2018

Texas-based space logistics firm NanoRacks has sent more than 600 commercial and educational payloads to the ISS. These small experiments rely on zero-gravity conditions on the ISS and are a testbed for a scaled-up manufacturing facility of the future. Rather than selling the ISS to a big corporation (Boeing currently operates the... Read more

April 21, 2018

Texas-based space logistics firm NanoRacks has sent more than 600 commercial and educational payloads to the ISS. These small experiments rely on zero-gravity conditions on the ISS and are a testbed for a scaled-up manufacturing facility of the future. Rather than selling the ISS to a big corporation (Boeing currently operates the station for NASA), CEO Jeffrey Manber suggests splitting it up into pieces. There could be a space hotel in one orbital location, for example, with another one set up especially for manufacturing.

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