2019-10-06

NDSC Criminal Justice Data Initiative

The Initiative began at the end of a decade that elevated the urgent need for reform across many parts of the criminal justice system. Although tensions between police and communities of color have existed for over century in the United... Read more
The Initiative began at the end of a decade that elevated the urgent need for reform across many parts of the criminal justice system. Although tensions between police and communities of color have existed for over century in the United States, the widespread availability of camera phones and movements like #BlackLivesMatter beginning in 2013 brought issues of violence and racial discrimination at the hands of law enforcement into the internet mainstream. Prison reform appeared in both the Democratic and Republican party platforms for the first time in the 2016 election. California, which has one of the country’s largest prison systems, passed a number of bi-partisan bills in recent years to end cash bail and the prosecution of children as adults. However, recent protests in cities around the world in response to the killing of George Floyd and many others by law enforcement clearly indicate that much more is needed in the way of police and justice reform to earn public trust. Research shows that Americans still have widely differing views on policing and the system as a whole, particularly across racial lines. A 2016 survey by Pew found that 75% of White Americans thought that police use the right amount of force in each situation and treat racial and ethnic groups equally. By comparison, just over a third of Black Americans thought the same. One explanation for this marked divide in opinion about policing and criminal justice could be a lack of data and information. Police departments are not required by federal law to report data on their activities to the FBI or to the public, and in 2016, under 60% of police departments reported arrest data to the FBI. Additionally, the Trump Administration’s elimination of police reforms put in place by the Obama Administration, including the use of consent decrees to bring federal oversight of troubled police departments, has eroded support from Black communities who feel agencies that practice racial profiling, use excessive force and other forms of unconstitutional policing are free to do so without impunity. Read less
Los Angeles, CA ( Local)
October 6, 2019

Recent activity

Neighborhood Data for Social Change
suggested a solution
48 days ago

Neighborhood Data for Social Change
suggested a solution
48 days ago
Matt Harrison
edited the project details
2 months ago
Erroll Southers
suggested a solution
2 months ago
Matt Harrison
edited the project details
2 months ago
Neighborhood Data for Social Change
suggested a solution
2 months ago
User
edited the project details
2 months ago
User
edited the project details
2 months ago
User
edited the project details
2 months ago
User
started a project
2 months ago

Neighborhood Data for Social Change for Sol Price Center for Social Innovation

October 6, 2020

  • People of color across all neighborhoods — especially people who identify as Black — are stopped at higher rates by the police than other groups. Across the City, Black Angelenos are stopped and arrested three times as often as White and Latino Angelenos.
  •  Listening... Read more
October 6, 2020

  • People of color across all neighborhoods — especially people who identify as Black — are stopped at higher rates by the police than other groups. Across the City, Black Angelenos are stopped and arrested three times as often as White and Latino Angelenos.
  •  Listening session participants expressed the harmful psychological impact of racial profiling by law enforcement and the lack of investments in community programs, education, and health services, particularly in South Los Angeles.
  •  Across the city of Los Angeles, civilian-initiated contact with the police, measured through calls for service, has steadily increased over the last decade. By contrast, police-initiated contact with civilians, measured through vehicle and pedestrian stops, decreased drastically in the beginning of the decade and then rose slightly after 2016.
  •  From 2011 – 2018, LAPD consistently stopped more people in South Los Angeles than other parts of the city.

Read less
No comments
Reply
Reply

Erroll Southers for USC Safe Communities Institute

January 6, 2021

You can't train, equip and dress people for war and have them go to communities to engage...This is an opportunity and a moment in our history where real change may actually occur. We're now seeing departments think outside the box. We're seeing communities hold people more accountable.

No comments
Reply
Reply

Neighborhood Data for Social Change for USC Safe Communities Institute

October 6, 2019

To better understand conceptions of public safety and support the growing public interest in criminal justice reform, the USC Price Center for Social Innovation partnered with Microsoft and the USC Price Safe Communities Institute to launch the NDSC Criminal Justice Data Initiative in the... Read more

October 6, 2019

To better understand conceptions of public safety and support the growing public interest in criminal justice reform, the USC Price Center for Social Innovation partnered with Microsoft and the USC Price Safe Communities Institute to launch the NDSC Criminal Justice Data Initiative in the spring of 2019. The project featured three main components:  A community engagement process that included stakeholder convenings and listening sessions to understand how law enforcement and community representatives think about public safety and use data in their work; Public safety data collection, aggregation and dissemination at the neighborhood level; and Storytelling that pairs data analysis with narrative-based insights into public safety trends across Los Angeles County neighborhoods.

Read less
No comments
Reply
Reply
Show more solutions

 

Your solution

Supporting info

Price, SCI Partners with Microsoft for Criminal Justice Data Project

2019/09/17 - USC

Announcing the NDSC Criminal Justice Data Initiative - Price Center for Social Innovation

- Price Center for Social Innovation

Empowering communities toward a more equitable criminal justice system - Microsoft On the Issues

- Microsoft On the Issues